Coys sets docket for Spring Classics sale

Coys sets docket for Spring Classics sale

Rolls-Royce trio headlines sale at Royal Horticultural Halls

Coys calls its annual Spring Classics auction a prelude to the motoring season in the UK. In other words, come buy a classic car now so you’re ready to enjoy it as the weather warms and the days get longer.

The sale is scheduled for April 24 at the Royal Horticultural Halls in London, where 50 collector classics and sports cars will be on the docket, Coys said.

“Our Spring Classics auction has for decades been a prelude to motoring season which is now very much upon us,” Chris Routledge, Coys chief executive, was quoted in the company’s news release. “This year we have a stunning selection (of) 50 fine historic and classic motor cars looking for a new owner, ranging from three original-bodied pre-war Rolls Royces through to a genuine barn find 1960s Bentley S3 Continental Coupe by Mulliner.”

Bentley out of the barn and ready to go across the block

The Rolls-Royce offerings include a 1920 40/50hp Silver Ghost by Barker (£60,000 – £80,000), a 1938 25/30 Sports Saloon by Thrupp and Maberly (£25,000 – £30,000) and a 1934 20/25 Sports Saloon by Hooper (£20,000 – £25,000). 

“These cars represent a thriving era for the Rolls-Royce marque, when it started to become a symbol of prestige, reliability and quality,” Coys commented, adding that the cars have pre-auction estimated values ranging from £20,000 to £80,000 ($28,500 to $114,000).

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Also on the docket are a 1951 Jaguar XK120 roadster, 1953 XK120 fixed-head coupe and 1962 and ’63 E-type roadsters, each of the quartet valued at between  £90,000 and £150,000 ($128,000 and $214,000).

Other featured cars include a 1949 Cadillac Series 62 custom “Cad Attack,” a 1955 Austin Healey 100/M and a 1938 Lancia Aprilia Monoposto.

The barn-found 1963 Bentley Continental Mulliner Park Ward S3 has a pre-auction value of £40,000 ($57,000). Coys said it was retired in the early 1990s “in expectation of a future restoration, which never happened, and has turned into a genuine time capsule.”

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