Red-ee for visitors: Alfa Romeo re-opens its museum

Museum has red canopy, and a red ribbon that leads from parking lot to entry way

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Alfa museum
Among vehicles featured in the 'Velocity' section of the Alfa Romeo Museum is the 33 Stradale | Museum photos

Calling itself a link between the past, present and future, the Alfa Romeo Museum in Arese, on the outskirts of Milan, offers a permanent display of 70 of the more than 200 vehicles in its collection, as well as a documentation center, restaurant, vehicle test track, and not only a gift shop, but the ability to purchase a new vehicle.

Closed by the coronavirus pandemic, the museum re-opened to visitors in late June with exhibits celebrating Alfa Romeo’s 110th anniversary.

Although Alfa Romeo has maintained a collection of its historic  vehicles — including the 24 HP that was the first motorcar bearing the A.L.F.A. brand — it wasn’t until 1976 that it built a separate museum to house the collection, and it wasn’t until 2015 that the facility was remodeled and opened to the public.

The remodel included a red canopy and red ribbon that cross the complex and lead from the parking lot to the museum. 

Red is the museum’s theme color
Tipo 159 Alfetta exercised on museum grounds

The vehicle array features three themes — a timeline of the brand’s production; “Bellezza,” cars beautiful in design and styling; and “Velocita,” which Alfa says displays “a synthesis of technology, sportiness and driving pleasure.”

While dozens of vehicles are on display, some 150 others are part of the company’s collection and can be seen during a monthly “Backstage” event. Also staged for a weekend each month is an “Open Bonnets” feature that exposes the engines on all of the cars on display in the museum. 

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The museum also hosts large-screen viewings of Formula 1 races. 

‘Velocita’
Bimotore

For more information, visit the museum website.

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A former daily newspaper sports editor, Larry Edsall spent a dozen years as an editor at AutoWeek magazine before making the transition to writing for the web and becoming the author of more than 15 automotive books. In addition to being founding editor at ClassicCars.com, Larry has written for The New York Times and The Detroit News and was an adjunct honors professor at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University.

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