Type 34 Karmann Ghia was VW’s ‘Razor’s Edge’

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Karmann Ghia

A couple of months ago, I was privileged to lead a group from Shriners Hospitals for Children on a tour of the docket for Barrett-Jackson’s annual Las Vegas collector car auction. During the tour, I pointed out several cars, including the one that had been my favorite when I scouted the cars the previous day.

That car was a 1968 Volkswagen Karmann Ghia, but not the usual and popular Type 14 model. It was one of the Type 34 versions built not on the Beetle chassis but the larger platform of the Type 3.

The Type 34 was not imported to the United States, but they are showing up from time to time and another of them is my choice for Pick of the Day.

The Pick of the Day is a 1966 Volkswagen Karman Ghia (Type 34) offered for sale on ClassicCars.com by a dealership in Jackson, Mississippi.

The dealership notes in its advertisement that the Type 34 debuted at the Frankfurt auto show in the fall of 1961 and production ran from that fall until the summer of 1969. It also quotes the Type 34 Registry as reporting that of the 42,500 Type 34s produced, fewer than 1,200 remain registered around the world. 

“According to Type 34 Registry, there are less than 400 Type 34’s currently in the U.S. of which only 200 are truly road worthy,” the dealer adds.

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The dealer also notes that the Type 34 was called the “Razor’s Edge” in England because of its sharply lined design, and it also was larger, roomier and more luxurious than the Type 14.

But it was more expensive, costing new about the same as a pair of Beetles.

The Type 34 on offer is done in Manila Yellow and has a manual transmission. The advertisement includes no details about the car’s engine. 

Among the photos included in the advertisement is a window sticker showing that the car took part in the Mississippi Gulf Coast VW Club’s 2019 car show. 

The asking price is $27,500. To view this listing on ClassicCars.com, see Pick of the Day.

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A former daily newspaper sports editor, Larry Edsall spent a dozen years as an editor at AutoWeek magazine before making the transition to writing for the web and becoming the author of more than 15 automotive books. In addition to being founding editor at ClassicCars.com, Larry has written for The New York Times and The Detroit News and was an adjunct honors professor at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University.

2 COMMENTS

    • You have it reversed – this body started and ended its appearance without any changes, therefore it would be more correct to say that the Chevrolet Monza has body styling like the VW Type 34. I own one, a 1963 in very good shape.

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