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HomePick of the DayPick of the Day: 1967 Pontiac Tempest convertible that’s not a GTO...

Pick of the Day: 1967 Pontiac Tempest convertible that’s not a GTO clone

With a 400cid V8 and 4-speed manual, this droptop has all the right ingredients

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The Pontiac GTO is so prevalent among collector cars that it seems odd to find a 1967 Tempest that’s not a GTO – indeed because so many of them have been cloned to appear as original examples of the iconic muscle car.

The Pick of the Day is a 1967 Pontiac Tempest convertible with an honest presentation as a standard model, although notably equipped with the same 400cid, 335-horsepower 4-barrel V8 of the GTO, and with a 4-speed manual transmission. 

tempest, Pick of the Day: 1967 Pontiac Tempest convertible that’s not a GTO clone, ClassicCars.com Journal

The Tempest was completely restored a few years back “and looks awesome,” according to the Gladstone, Oregon, dealer advertising the Pontiac on ClassicCars.com

“The burgundy exterior paint and convertible tan power top are in excellent condition,” the seller says. “The front and rear bumper is nicely chrome. All the glass has no cracks or stars.

“Equipped with tilt steering, power steering, power brakes, power top and dual exhaust. The burgundy interior bench seat looks great without any rips or tears. The dash also has no cracks.”

tempest

This is the second-generation Tempest, upsized to midsize, and which received a restyling for 1966, carried over to ’67.   The optional 400cid V8 was new for 1967, and became the mid-performance-level engine for the GTO. 

In my book, this was the best-looking era stylistically for the Tempest/GTO, the stacked headlights and “Coke-bottle” shape working to make it both sporty and classy. These are great-driving cars, too. 

tempest

Although muscle car fans might see the lack of GTO badging as a detriment, as well the extra sport features, the Tempest version is essentially the same car, especially set up like this one with the big engine and manual shifting. 

The big difference is the pricing, with the value of the regular Tempest significantly undercutting that of comparable GTOs.  Which is another reason why it’s rare to find one in correct condition.

tempest, Pick of the Day: 1967 Pontiac Tempest convertible that’s not a GTO clone, ClassicCars.com Journal

This one is fairly priced at $37,500, which seems like a lot of beautiful and muscular convertible for the money.

“These Tempest convertibles are rare, with continued care and maintenance should continue to increase in value over time,” the dealer notes.

To view this vehicle on ClassicCars.com, see Pick of the Day

Hagerty
Bob Golfen
Bob Golfen is a longtime automotive writer and editor, focusing on new vehicles, collector cars, car culture and the automotive lifestyle. He is the former automotive writer and editor for The Arizona Republic and SPEED.com, the website for the SPEED motorsports channel. He has written free-lance articles for a number of publications, including Autoweek, The New York Times and Barrett-Jackson auction catalogs. A collector car enthusiast with a wide range of knowledge about the old cars that we all love and desire, Bob enjoys tinkering with archaic machinery. His current obsession is a 1962 Porsche 356 Super coupe.

5 COMMENTS

  1. I appreciate that this car was kept original and not “upgraded” to a GTO. The ‘66 and ‘67 Tempests/GTOs were the most attractive years of that model, in my opinion. My dad bought a ‘66 Tempest new with a 326 v8 and the Powerglide automatic. Dad put over 200,000 miles on that car with 2 complete overhauls along the way. It was his daily driver for his job in sales and we took 2 a road trip to Pennsylvania, New York, and Iowa. Great car!

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