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HomeCar CultureVideo game lets you restore an historic Route 66 gas station

Video game lets you restore an historic Route 66 gas station

Haven’t you dreamt of buying and restoring a building on the Mother Road?

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Ever dream of buying and restoring one of those historic buildings along historic Route 66? Now you can, at least in the virtual world.

Route66news.com reports about a new video game that lets you restore and reopen a service station along the Mother Road. “Gas Station Simulator” has been available since mid-September for $19.99 on the Stream online platform. 

The Route66 website reports Games Radar says since its launch, “Gas Station Simulator,” developed by Drago Entertainment, has been among the top-5 in video game sales.

“It starts,” Ron Warnick writes on the Route66 website, “with you driving your really cool car — complete with a smoking dog bobblehead — through a desert before pulling into the Dust Bowl Gas Stop and buying it from the owner. Shortly after, you get a call from your uncle who tells you that your grandfather once owned it, and he’s happy to help you get it back into shape…

“You even have to build everything from the ground up. Starting with breaking down 2×4 planks to get into your new gas station and driving a front loader to remove sand from the parking lot and pumps, there’s actually a fair bit of work to do before you can start serving customers. 

“Aiming and tossing garbage bags and other trash into dumpsters — Kobe! — is dumb fun that even tracks your furthest distance with a triumphant ‘high score’ sign. Oh, and that kid that keeps showing up and tagging the stop with spray paint? Throwing trash at him is fun, too.

“There’s a simple kind of fun in the other tasks,” he adds. “Filling up a person’s car presents a meter, which tells you when you need to stop. The Shift key speeds the meter up, but you’ll have to be quick to stop if you want the maximum tip.”

Larry Edsall
A former daily newspaper sports editor, Larry Edsall spent a dozen years as an editor at AutoWeek magazine before making the transition to writing for the web and becoming the author of more than 15 automotive books. In addition to being founding editor at ClassicCars.com, Larry has written for The New York Times and The Detroit News and was an adjunct honors professor at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University.

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