fbpx
HomePick of the DayPick of the Day: 1947 Crosley pickup, tiny truck that makes big...

Pick of the Day: 1947 Crosley pickup, tiny truck that makes big impression

The microcar has undergone total restoration, the seller says

-

Compact trucks are nothing new, but few were ever as diminutive as the Crosley pickup from the short-lived Cincinnati automaker that produced a full lineup of pint-sized vehicles from 1947-52, after a brief startup in 1939 that was interrupted by World War II.

The Pick of the Day is a 1947 Crosley pickup from the first year of production, a desirable “round-side” model with the same pontoon styling as the sedan, only with a pickup bed.  

crosley, Pick of the Day: 1947 Crosley pickup, tiny truck that makes big impression, ClassicCars.com Journal

This one has been comprehensively restored, finished in December 2018, starting with an example driven just 24,000 miles in more than seven decades and driven 220 miles since, according to the North Canton, Ohio, private seller advertising the Crosley on ClassicCars.com

Built on an 80-inch wheelbase, the teensy truck rides on 12-inch wheels and is propelled by its original 724cc 4-cylinder engine that generates a ripping 26.5 horsepower.  Top speed is said to be about 50 mph, so best to avoid the freeway.

crosley

This might not be the most practical pickup for hauling cargo, but its cartoon looks give it tons of appeal.  In light blue with red steel wheels and tiny hubcaps, the Crosley is presented in what looks to be excellent condition, as described by what sounds to be a passionate Crosley fan.

“Factory nuts and bolts used throughout to retain authenticity,” the seller notes. “As far as I know, there is nothing on this truck that is not authentically correct. Very nice restoration.

“This truck won 1st place at the most recent Crosley Nationals in Wauseon, Ohio, July 2019.” 

crosley, Pick of the Day: 1947 Crosley pickup, tiny truck that makes big impression, ClassicCars.com Journal

In case you missed the Crosley Nationals, the event celebrates Ohio’s own microcar brand, which was marketed in the post-war years to “the forgotten man” who rejected the bigger-is-better ethos of most American cars.  Crosley shut down in 1952 after selling a relatively small number of cars, making those that survive conversation-starting novelties wherever they go.

The asking price for this little hunk of Americana is $14,500.

To view this vehicle on ClassicCars.com, see Pick of the Day

crosley

Hagerty
Bob Golfen
Bob Golfen is a longtime automotive writer and editor, focusing on new vehicles, collector cars, car culture and the automotive lifestyle. He is the former automotive writer and editor for The Arizona Republic and SPEED.com, the website for the SPEED motorsports channel. He has written free-lance articles for a number of publications, including Autoweek, The New York Times and Barrett-Jackson auction catalogs. A collector car enthusiast with a wide range of knowledge about the old cars that we all love and desire, Bob enjoys tinkering with archaic machinery. His current obsession is a 1962 Porsche 356 Super coupe.

5 COMMENTS

  1. As a small child, my fondest memory was waiting for the “ice Cream Man” to ring his bell coming through our neighborhood. My favorite was a Crosley with a big insulated box on the back loaded with Fudgecicles and Nuttybuddies.

  2. I had a chance to buy a really decent Crosley station wagon for $500. Test drive – blown head gasket . What the hay is a 16 yr. old going to do about that ? Skip it and go surfing ! And thus , my mistake. I can only imagine what it would be like to show up at Home Dump to have a major load of lumber piled on this beauty ( with an F450 waiting in the shadows)…HA HA HA.
    P.S. Enjoy your writing very much. SF in IB

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Recent Posts