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Home Pick of the Day Pick of the Day: 1960 Morris Minor with a top that drops

Pick of the Day: 1960 Morris Minor with a top that drops

This 1960 Series III 1000 convertible is black and white and red inside

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Until seeing the advertisement for the Pick of the Day, I didn’t realize the Morris Minor was produced in such delightful and captivating convertible form. Nonetheless, this Pick of the Day, a 1960 Morris Minor Series III convertible, being offered for sale on ClassicCars.com by a private seller in Solana Beach, California.

“This beautiful and collectible 1960 Morris Minor 1000 convertible is finished in white with a black soft top over a red interior,” the seller reports. “The car is powered by a replacement 948cc A-series inline-four paired with a four-speed manual gearbox. The motor runs extremely well and the transmission shifts perfectly.”

The seller adds that there is a 1½-inch tear in the top that was repaired with rubber cement by the previous owner, who also refurbished the interior with red upholstery, carpeting and door panels.

“Interior features include a banjo-style steering wheel, an under-dash-mounted heater, two in-dash storage compartments, and red door pulls,” the ad says. “A centrally mounted 80-mph Smiths speedometer includes a built-in fuel-level gauge and warning lights for oil pressure and ignition, as well as a high-beam indicator light.”

The seller notes that odometer shows little more than 6,000 miles, “approximately 3k of which were added by the seller, and true mileage is unknown.”

The engine, which is fed by a single SU carburetor, was sent to Bath, England, in 1991 for service and reconditioning. The seller says all service records for the Morris are included in the purchase. The asking price is $16,750.

Morris introduced the Minor as “the world’s supreme small car” in 1949. The engine was upgraded to the 37-horsepower BMC unit for 1957 with the launch of the Series III. 

The Minor was designed by Alec Issigonis, who is best remembered for his Morris Mini.

To view this listing on ClassicCars.com, see Pick of the Day.

Larry Edsall
A former daily newspaper sports editor, Larry Edsall spent a dozen years as an editor at AutoWeek magazine before making the transition to writing for the web and becoming the author of more than 15 automotive books. In addition to being founding editor at ClassicCars.com, Larry has written for The New York Times and The Detroit News and was an adjunct honors professor at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University.

6 COMMENTS

  1. If you refurbished the interior why would you not replace the top instead of leaving a “ L “ shaped tear which distracts from the vehicles appearance? Just asking.

  2. Owned a pale green model back in the 60’s. Lots of fun on the flat, and during downhill runs. One fine summer evening, in Vancouver’s West End neighbourhood, I was stopped at a corner and a young woman jumped into the car, slammed the door on her legs two or three times, jumped out and hobbled away without a word.

    Similar event while driving my long-gone 912 coupe, but without the leg-breaking.

  3. Yeah putting 350s in Morris Minors is kind of a sin. I own about 40 Morris Minors and not one of them is turned into a speed machine. Guess I’m old-school. I think there are more Morris Minors per capita here in Port Townsend than anywhere else in the states.
    Just for your info the convertibles are called a “Tourer”, the pickups are called “Utes”, the two door and four doors are called “Saloons”, the vans are called “LCVs, and the woody wagons are named “Travellers”
    Rob Gruye’

  4. I agree with the individual that stated that the top should have been replaced. It would be consistent with the overall appearance and quality of the vehicle.

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