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Home Pick of the Day Pick of the Day: 1988 BMW M6 coupe low-mileage road burner

Pick of the Day: 1988 BMW M6 coupe low-mileage road burner

The successor to the iconic 3.0 CSL is powered by an M1 supercar engine

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One of the most important BMW models of all time is the 3.0 CSL, which was a high-performance road car built to homologate the BMW CSL racers. These are integral to the history of the BMW brand and have become mythic in the BMW model range as the first “Ultimate Driving Machine.” The downside for collectors is that a 3.0 CSL is also quite expensive.

There is an alternative to the CSL, however, that is just starting to show up on collectors’ radars:  the BMW M6. The M6 is the spiritual successor to the 3.0 CSL, taking the stunning 6 Series body, inserting the 3.5-liter inline-6 engine from the M1 supercar under the hood, improving the suspension and adding much-needed aerodynamic aids for the car. Those aids were needed as the M6 was a true 155 mph road burner.

The Pick of the Day is a 1988 BMW M6 coupe that has covered only 34,000 miles from new, advertised on ClassicCars.com by a dealer in Huntington Station, New York. The M6, finished in Cinnabar Red with a Lotus White leather interior and beige carpeting, has its original paint and interior.

The M6 is described as a superb example with its original books, tool kit, spare tire, jack and complete service records from new.  The car has always been serviced per the BMW schedule and was always well-kept regardless of use, the seller says.

BMW

The factory options on this car include power front seats, self-leveling rear suspension (replaced with Bilstein parts though the original suspension comes with the car), sunshade for rear occupants and an 8-speaker premium sound system. The only items not original to this BMW are the upgraded radio and suspension components, the dealer notes.

The history of this car is an example of what to buy if you want the best. The records with the car indicate that it was initially sold by JMK BMW in Springfield, New Jersey.  Its most recent owner has had the car since 1996 with only 11,000 miles added since, the seller says, adding that this M6 has never seen inclement weather or been involved in any accidents.

BMW

These cars have been moving up in price. They were rare when new with only 1,632 shipped to the United States from 1987 to 1989. This stunning example of the BMW M6 has an asking price of $79,500 or best offer.

To view this listing on ClassicCars.com, see Pick of the Day.

Hagerty
Andy Reid
Andy Reid's first car, purchased at age 15, was a 1968 Fiat 124 coupe. His second, obtained by spending his college savings fund, was a 1966 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2. Since then, he has owned more than 150 cars—none of them normal or reasonable—as well as numerous classic motorcycles and scooters. A veteran of film, television, advertising and helping to launch a few Internet-based companies, Reid was a columnist for Classic Motorsports magazine for 12 years and has written for several other publications. He is considered an expert in European sports and luxury cars and is a respected concours judge. He lives in Canton, Connecticut.

9 COMMENTS

  1. Dave, if you think that asking price is legit, you’re not as much of a car guy as you think you are. Sure this is low miles blah blah, but these are around for much less. That price is ridiculous.

  2. The reasoning above is rather crazy….to compare an (actual or probable) classic and/or collectible to a modern car – in price to function is foolish. First it ignores the value principles of availability and much more.
    Maybe understanding that for example this car (but not all) – say 15 years ago – was worth less than now. And the new top flute BMW then worth more than it. That 15 yo BMW is NOT worth more, nor desired more, nor comparably performs any different now than then. And in fact, comparing it to any new not just BMW but any number of new “normal” cars would indicate the new car is superior in most functions.

    But the objection to price is justified when running a quick search shows several sort of comparable M6 on the market for the $50k range. It is priced way high for what it is (which is the completeness of value), NOT for what it isn’t – which is actually rather meaningless.

  3. Oh, dear. As I’ve written before: any car is worth exactly what someone is willing to pay. Period. Why the crabbiness and carping?
    I served as a military advisor to the Kingdom (KSA) in the early/mid ’80’s, and saw CSLs, cut body Quattros (yeah, THOSE Quattros), AMG Hammers, Ferrari 400i models both auto & stick, purple (“Viola”) Lambo Countachs with white interiors and 18k gold trim, Gemballa Porsche conversions in colors/options not to be believed (real ostrich skin leather, in vivid pea green, anyone?)… although, due to the intense sun, most Saudi exotica was white on the exterior, there were many *ahem* who bought what they wanted, solar heating be damned. 1982, in Riyadh, I saw a ’77 Pontiac CanAm (‘member those?) painted Saudi flag green with white and silver trim. ’60’s ‘Vette sidemounts & Dayton wires with 3″ whitewalls.
    Point? Folk want what they want. Each of these gaudy displays had a buyer/owner that felt like he was on top of the world, and had the best car EVER.
    There’s an old Roman adage, something like “de gustibus non disputandum”- forgive my Latin, college decades ago- that simply means that taste cannot be argued.
    Trust me, Yannis: if that was my dream car, I’d be talking hard to the owner. Money can’t buy happiness, but it’s a damn good way to get what makes one happy, yes?

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