Stainless-steel Ford trio consigned to Worldwide sale

Automaker and Allegheny Ludlum created coachwork to showcase gleaming new metal with mirror finish

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A complete set of the stainless-steel Fords will be offered as a single lot at the Labor Day weekend sale in Auburn, Indiana | Worldwide Auctioneers photos

In 1935, to promote the durability and aesthetic appeal of the newly developed material called stainless steel, Ford and Allegheny Ludlum Steel of Pittsburgh worked together to clothe half a dozen 1936 Ford Deluxe sedans with stainless coachwork.

Each of the cars was driven by Allegheny Ludlum executives, logging more than 200,000 miles until the cars were retired in 1946. Of the half-dozen, four are known to still exist.

Ford and Allegheny Ludlum would repeat the process years later, joining to do a pair of 1960 Thunderbirds — again, each driven more than 100,000 miles as a touring showpiece — and, later, a trio of 1967 Lincoln Continental convertibles.

Allegheny Ludlum, now known as Allegheny Technologies, donated one of the ’36 Fords to the Heinz History Center in Pittsburgh, where it is part of the center’s permanent collection.

But the company also retained one of each version and that trio has been consigned as a single consignment to the 13th annual The Auburn Auction scheduled for Labor Day weekend in Auburn, Indiana, by Worldwide Auctioneers.

The Lincoln, vintage Ford and Thunderbird, each with a stainless-steel body

The three will be sold without reserve, and as a single lot, added Worldwide, which termed the consignment “an extraordinary opportunity to acquire a trio of historic cars.”

“They are extraordinary artifacts from a dynamic era of innovation for the both the steel and automotive industries in America,” Worldwide’s John Kruse said. “After lifetime custodianship, Allegheny Ludlum believe that they deserve to take their place in a significant collection or museum where they can be more widely appreciated in a collector car environment for generations to come, and we are honored to have been entrusted with their sale.”

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A former daily newspaper sports editor, Larry Edsall spent a dozen years as an editor at AutoWeek magazine before making the transition to writing for the web and becoming the author of more than 15 automotive books. In addition to being founding editor at ClassicCars.com, Larry has written for The New York Times and The Detroit News and was an adjunct honors professor at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University.

6 COMMENTS

  1. I am interested in the 3 cars to buy I do not buy at auctions only personally and when the confinement ends because I am Argentine and I do not speak English and I am 72 years old and I do not do paperwork or buy online I want to know the price for the lot of 3

  2. I am interested in the 3 cars to buy I do not buy at auctions only personally and when the confinement ends because I am Argentine and I do not speak English and I am 72 years old and I do not do paperwork or buy online I want to know the price for the lot of 3

    carlos.virga@gmail.com

  3. Carlos, it doesn’t work like that, You need to get with the times, and auction makes it fair for all, and shows the real world value in most cases. Good luck!!

  4. Imagine if it had been the 37 with the tear drop headlamps, I can only fantasize of how beautiful it would have looked in Stainless Steel. As it is, these three will fetch a pretty large number as a single lot. I’ll wager somewhere around the 1.5 to 2.5 million mark as a total lot of the three. Let’s see how close I get with my guess.

  5. I totally understand Carlos! I have been both a buyer and seller at “well-known” auctions. The last one I had cars at, I KNOW two of my cars were sold too fast and too low. One of them during the inspection time before the auction began, I had many “bidders” carefully inspect every detail of one of the cars. One of them was in my direct line of sight during the auction of my car. His card was still in the air when they hammered down to another bidder. The “high bidder” was not on the floor, “phone bidder” I went over to the guy after the hammer was down. He was not happy and complained. I told him to go see the auction company because I saw what happened. They told him sorry, they did not see him. I am sure I lost at least 20,000 on that one car. Yes, there was at least two other bidders somewhere in the building.

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