Jewelry made from car-body metal

Speeedometer-themed wrist cuffs by Crash Jewelry

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jewelry
Wrist cuffs look like speedometers and are made from actual auto-body metal | Crash Jewelry photos

You likely won’t be able to get one delivered in time for Valentine’s Day, but that doesn’t mean the car gal — or car guy — in your life won’t appreciate one of the new speedometer-themed wrist cuffs that Crash Jewelry of Los Angeles produces from actual luxury sports car metal.

The cuffs, which are designed as “uni-sex” products, are available in either laser-engraved or brass-overlay styles, Crash says, and are made from metal from one of 5 vehicles — BMW 7 Series, Maserati GT, Mercedes-Benz S Class, Porsche Macan and Dodge Charger.

“Using emerging laser technology, CRASH Speedometer Cuff’s innovative designs are created through a process that selectively preserves the vehicle’s original factory paint,” Crash said in its news release. 

“The finished product resembles a speedometer pattern that seemingly emerges from the car’s finish. This inventive process allows Crash Jewelry the opportunity to share their collection with a larger audience in greater volume.

Each piece is made by hand, “which takes time,” Crash founder Christi Schimpke is quoted in the announcement. However, she added, “Introducing laser technology will allow us to share our products with more people, faster.”

Schimpke’s husband has an auto body shop that specializes in late-model luxury and exotic vehicles.

Prices range from $150 to $189 depending on whether they are laser-engraved or have brass overlay. For information, visit the Crash Jewelry website.

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A former daily newspaper sports editor, Larry Edsall spent a dozen years as an editor at AutoWeek magazine before making the transition to writing for the web and becoming the author of more than 15 automotive books. In addition to being founding editor at ClassicCars.com, Larry has written for The New York Times and The Detroit News and was an adjunct honors professor at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University.

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