McLaren hopes to electrify ‘next-generation’ of drivers

0
791
Big and little 720S McLarens | McLaren Automotive photos

Saying it hopes to “electrify” the next generation of supercar enthusiasts, McLaren Automotive has unveiled a children’s ride-on version of the McLaren 720S, and offers the smaller version in Papaya Spark, a color the full-size sports car won’t get until later this year.

The child’s car also has an infotainment system that can play music or show a movie on the dashboard screen, McLaren said.

Don’t worry about distracted driving, however; there’s a remote control that offers parental-driving mode.

“Empowering this young new generation of enthusiasts with the unparalleled driver involvement that has made the McLaren sportscars and supercars from Woking, UK, acclaimed around the world, the new Ride-On takes the genre to the next level of McLaren authenticity,” McLaren Automotive said in its news release. 

“And with a range of popular McLaren colors available, 3-to-6-year-olds have never had it so good, being able to choose from Azores Orange, Belize Blue, Lantana Purple, Onyx Black, Mauvine Blue, Silica White, or Saros Grey.”

McLaren speculates that the 720S “Ride-On” will become “the talk of the playground.” 

“Functioning dihedral doors combined with exposed carbon-style elements and signature 720S styling cues immediately identifies the model with the actual car,” it notes.

The child’s version is electric powered but has a sound generator linked to the accelerator pedal “because we all like to hear an engine!”

RELATED:  Icon 4X4 debuts its first example of an Old School Edition Thriftmaster

The junior 720S has an MSRP of £315 ($400).

Advertisement
A former daily newspaper sports editor, Larry Edsall spent a dozen years as an editor at AutoWeek magazine before making the transition to writing for the web and becoming the author of more than 15 automotive books. In addition to being founding editor at ClassicCars.com, Larry has written for The New York Times and The Detroit News and was an adjunct honors professor at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here