Several features make this a rare ’66 Mustang

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Funny to consider that the rarest of the 1966 Ford Mustangs were those with inline 6-cylinder engines. According to the Standard Catalog of American Cars, Mustangs produced with V8 engines outnumbered those with inline 6s by 354,400 to 253,200.

Of the three body styles available that model year, fastbacks were rarest — only 35,698 rolled out of the assembly plants. But while there were 535,449 Mustangs that year with fixed roofs, there were only 72,119 with convertible tops.

And guess what? There was something even more rare than a convertible with a 6-cylinder engine: only 3,190 of those ’66 Mustang convertibles were built with front bench seats instead of buckets.

One such car is our Pick of the Day, a 1966 Ford Mustang convertible, with a 200cid straight-6 and a front bench seat. The car came out of an estate after being owned by the same family for 37 years, according to the private seller advertising the cars on ClassicCars.com.

“Spring’s right around the corner, here’s … a nice Mustang convertible for that summer fun cruising making memories,” the seller reports.

The seller adds that the car has an automatic transmission, 90,000 miles driven since new, “it runs and drives great,” and the interior is “super nice.”

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The car also has a new convertible top with glass backlight.

The car, red inside and out with a white convertible top, is located in New Lebanon, Ohio, and is for sale for $15,000.

The car presents nicely in the photos that are with the advertisement, which you can view on ClassicCars.com.

https://classiccars.com/listings/view/1191249/1966-ford-mustang-for-sale-in-new-lebanon-ohio-45345

A former daily newspaper sports editor, Larry Edsall spent a dozen years as an editor at AutoWeek magazine before making the transition to writing for the web and becoming the author of more than 15 automotive books. In addition to being founding editor at ClassicCars.com, Larry has written for The New York Times and The Detroit News and was an adjunct honors professor at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University.

11 COMMENTS

  1. The 66 Mustang brings back memories. I remember as a teen going to Stengers Ford on South Dixie Drive (where this Mustang was purchased) when my Dad was going to buy a car in 1967. It was a huge dealership. The showroom was leen but youcould put about 8 cars spaced well along its length as I remember. I begged and pleaded for him to buy a Mustang for Mom’s car, as I had my learners permit and I was 15 in 1967……16 and able to drive in 1968. No…the old Man bought her a Galaxie 500 with some bells and whistles. I complained to Mom…and she said Dad wouldn’t buy the Mustang because of my older brothers driving record…and didn’t want any carnage on nice cars from me. The Mustang was "sporty" in his mind…….meaning "faster & wrekable". My brother was 22 and already out of the house since he was 18…but his reputation as a car wrecker would not leave. Pissed me off.

  2. Yes, but after all of the detailed story and description, why does this 1966 Mustang have 1965 wheel covers instead of 1966 wheel covers? They just didn’t come this way.

    • I don’t recall reading anything about the seller stating the car being 100% original. I doubt anyone born in 1966 have all their original teeth either.

    • Maybe the owner liked the ‘65 wheel covers better ? Who knows , not a big problem
      They look good , and $15,000 ,, for a nice convertible mustang , you are going to whine and pretend to be a mustang expert ?

      I hope he sells it for a premium !
      Beautiful Mustang !

  3. I’ll say it again: always interesting when cars nobody wanted and/or were considered bad combinations become "rare collectibles". In their day we called six-cylinder Mustangs "Cheapskate Specials" since the V8 option was so inexpensive.As for a non-bucket-seat convertible, great idea as a make-out car. So, an automatic six-cylinder bench seat combination? Wow.

    • What else can you buy for $15,000 that will be as much fun as this car ? You can enjoy it for years , then get your money back or make a profit ? Ha 😉

      The point is, it’s such a fun deal , quit your bitching about inane details

      Sure a V8 would be nice , but this is fun also , I don’t see a lot of ragtop Mustangs of this vintage for $15k with a V8 and this condition

      Look how simple that engine is to work on
      A kid would kill for this first car !

      Someone will be very happy with this Mustang

  4. Hi everyone,

    Is a 6 cylinder power full enough for this car? It save you much money to buy instead of an 8 cylinder?

    Regards off Jaak from the Netherlands :-).

    • My wife and I have owned a Signalflare Red 66 Mustang convertible since 2005 with a 6 cylinder and many people are surprised about that.We have a corner bookcase that is filled top to bottom with trophies and awards that the little red pony has garnered during our ownership which proves that you don’t need a V8 under the hood to get a "thumbs up" from all age groups and genders.I often tell admirers that the pony doesn’t pass many cars but it sure passes gas stations!

  5. I have a original 66 Mustang with a roof that slides back with a little crank to use to sled the roof back. I saw a few years back that these were built for over seas only. Does any one know anything about a car like this? Mine is a GT. Has auto transmission. Bucket seats,power steering,power brakes,and AC. I also have a 66 coupe ,never been touched. When I measure from floor to ceiling from inside the car right behind the drivers seat. Both cars measure the same.Neither car has been touched. I bought both cars back in the early 70’s. Glenn Hastings.

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