Mansell’s ‘Red Five’ racer heads to auction

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In seven starts, Nigel Mansell drove the 'Red Five' to victory five times | Bonhams photos

The 1992 “Red Five” Williams-Renault that Nigel Mansell drove to the World Driving Championship will be offered for sale at Bonhams auction scheduled for July 5 during the Goodwood Festival of Speed, the auction company announced Wednesday.

Mansell drove FW14B chassis 08 in seven races in 1992, winning five of them and finishing second in another. Overall, the car took part in 13 of the 16 Grand Prix events that season, Bonhams said. After Mansell’s starts and victories, the car was assigned to his teammate, Riccardo Patrese.

‘Red Five’ became ‘White Six’ when the car went to Mansell’s teammate

The car, which started from the pole seven times, was known as “Red Five” when Mansell drove and as “White Six” while driven by Patrese, who was runner-up to Mansell in the final drivers’ point standings.

During the season, Mansell won nine times, breaking the record set by Ayrton Senna. He also became the first British champion since James Hunt in 1976.

Designed by Adrian Newey, the FW14B was powered by Renault’s 3.5-liter V10 engine and featured Williams Grand Prix’ 6-speed semi-automatic transmission and ride-leveling active suspension.

After the 1992 season, the car was retained by the Williams team until selling it to a private owner, who kept it in running order, Bonhams said, adding that the “V10-cylinder engine and the sophisticated hydraulic active-suspension system have been exercised in recent weeks.”

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Bonhams has not released a pre-auction estimated value for the car.

A former daily newspaper sports editor, Larry Edsall spent a dozen years as an editor at AutoWeek magazine before making the transition to writing for the web and becoming the author of more than 15 automotive books. In addition to being founding editor at ClassicCars.com, Larry has written for The New York Times and The Detroit News and was an adjunct honors professor at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University.

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