Jaguar D-type, one-off Ferrari elevated to star status at Gooding auction

Jaguar D-type, one-off Ferrari elevated to star status at Gooding auction

Two very-special cars, one for the track and one for the road, highlight the January docket in Arizona

A groundbreaking race car from England and a unique sport/luxury GT from Italy have been dubbed the “star cars” of Gooding & Company’s Scottsdale auction, each climbing into eight figures in estimated value.

The British entry is one of just two Jaguar D-type endurance racers painted bright red. The 1956 D-type, chassis number XKD 518, was originally sold to famed race driver Peter Blond, who competed with the strikingly aerodynamic car with success. The red race car then went to a number of prominent owners, including Led Zeppelin band manager Peter Grant.

Jaguar’s D-type was a stunning departure from race car orthodoxy, with its lightweight monocoque alloy construction and steel subframes. Jaguar won three consecutive 24 Hours of Le Mans competitions in 1955-57 with its factory D-types.

In original condition with matching-numbers twin-cam engine, this Jaguar “possesses a well-documented UK racing history and a rich, unbroken provenance,” according to a Gooding news release. The Jag is valued at $10 million to $12 million.

The Ferrari 275 GTB was used by Battista Pininfarina as his personal car

The Italian car is a designer Ferrari, a 1965 275 GTB Speciale, chassis 06437, that is the only 275 GTB designed and built by Carrozzeria Pininfarina rather than Scaglietti. Built for display, the car became the personal transport for the renowned head of the Italian design house, Battista Pininfarina, who was justifiably proud of his company’s creation.

The differences between the personalized Pininfarina car and the Ferrari factory models include a one-off interior with special seats, electric windows and Heuer Rally-Master stopwatches among the gauges.

Outside, the designer Ferrari has more-prominent front indicators, recessed side marker lights, a special grille, unique clear headlamp covers, custom window frames, sleeker door handles, distinctive hood to fit the six-carb intake of the V12 engine, a deleted window vent on the driver’s side and a distinctive rear diffuser fitted under the slim bumper.

After Pininfarina unveiled the 275 GTB Speciale, it was shown on the designer’s display stand at the 1965 Frankfurt Motor Show, the 1965 Paris Motor Show, the 1965 Torino Motor Show, the 1965 Florence Concours d’Elegance, and the 1966 Brussels Motor Show. The car was restored to its original appearance in 1992.

The unique Ferrari has been kept out of the public eye by its current owner for more than 25 years. It is valued from $8 million to $10 million.

“One of the most important and distinctive Ferraris ever built, this 275 GTB Speciale is a masterpiece of mid-century industrial art that represents the intersection of two of the most famous Italian firms working at the height of their powers,” Gooding says in its release.

The two starring cars are on the docket for Gooding’s sale January 19-20 at Scottsdale Fashion Square during Arizona’s famous Classic Car Week.

“What could be better than one of the most original D-Type Jaguars and a one-off 275 GTB Ferrari with countless special features built for Battista Pininfarina?” David Gooding, founder and president of Gooding & Company, said in a news release.

“Both possess everything that the most-discerning collectors value – spectacular design, impeccable provenance, and rarity.”

For information about Gooding’s Scottsdale auction, visit the event website.

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