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Diego’s Friday AutoHunter Picks

A random assortment of classics for the weekend

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In preparation for the weekend, we have another selection of fine automotive examples on AutoHunter worthy of your interest and attention (if I may be so bold). All of them resonate with me for random reasons, and perhaps you can add your particular reason why they may or may not resonate with you.

1960 buick electra 225, Diego’s Friday AutoHunter Picks, ClassicCars.com Journal
1960 Buick Electra 225 convertible

1960 Buick Electra 225 convertible
Out of all of GM’s redesigned Mopar-fighters for 1959-60, the Buick has always been the most polarizing to me. I’ve never been too keen on the canted headlights of the ’59 Buick, but I’ve warmed up to the 1960 once someone showed me the contours that emanate from the headlights and reach the door — a nice touch.

1960 buick electra 225, Diego’s Friday AutoHunter Picks, ClassicCars.com Journal
401ci Nailhead V8 

I tend to have an affinity for the higher trim levels for Buicks of this era. The Electra 225 was available with bucket seats, which is something that I don’t associate with luxury models though I think in the era it was not unusual till sporty buckets-and-console models started to take hold. This 1960 Electra 225 on AutoHunter has the standard vinyl bench, but it still exudes class in ways that few cars could in 1960. Worth mentioning is the Mirrormagic instrument panel, which used an adjustable mirror to give you a glare- and reflection-free view of the speedometer. And note the Wildcat 445 decal on the air cleaner, which signified the torque of the 325-horsepower 401 that was standard in the Electra series.

1960 buick electra 225, Diego’s Friday AutoHunter Picks, ClassicCars.com Journal
1967 Ford Fairlane GT/A

1967 Ford Fairlane GT/A
I can’t say I’ve been a fan of these either. I prefer the Cyclone’s styling and, between the 1966-67 Fairlane, I prefer aspects of the 1966’s styling. Objectively, one of the problems with these cars is that the 390 was not much competition for the GTO despite the “How to cook a Tiger” advertising; another was that Ford downgraded both the standard engine (390 in 1966, 289 in 1967) and the horsepower rating of the 390 (335 in 1966, 320 in 1967).

1960 buick electra 225, Diego’s Friday AutoHunter Picks, ClassicCars.com Journal
Note the dash-mounted tach.

Nonetheless, there’s nothing wrong with these cars at all.  If anything, Ford was first to offer a good automatic with manual control, hence the “A” in GT/A. This Fairlane GT/A on AutoHunter has received some mechanical upgrades that include a 750cfm Holley, upgraded camshaft, headers and 3.55 gears. For a Ford guy, there is a lot to like here.

1960 buick electra 225, Diego’s Friday AutoHunter Picks, ClassicCars.com Journal
1934 Pierce-Arrow 836A sedan

1934 Pierce-Arrow 836A Sedan
I’ve long-known that Buffalo-based Pierce-Arrow was one of the great cars in American history, part of the “Three Ps” (Packard, Pierce-Arrow and Peerless). What I didn’t know was that the company introduced a less expensive model to deal with the effects of the Great Depression, though it was still substantially more expensive than Cadillac’s LaSalle. Known as model 836A, it was available as a two-door Club Brougham and four-door Sedan. Its 135-horsepower V8 was down five horses from senior V8 models, and the 136-inch wheelbase was down three, though Pierce-Arrow also offered cars with V12s and 147-inch wheelbases.

1960 buick electra 225, Diego’s Friday AutoHunter Picks, ClassicCars.com Journal
1934 Pierce-Arrow 836A sedan

Of course, most Pierce-Arrows since 1914 can be identified by the trademark design with headlights fared into the front fenders, a look that wouldn’t be adopted by others until the mid/late-1930s. Ironically, the state of New York outlawed this configuration, which is one explanation why not all Pierce-Arrows had this unique look. Only 1,740 Pierce-Arrows were built in 1934, which wasn’t enough to sustain the brand after a few more years.

1960 buick electra 225, Diego’s Friday AutoHunter Picks, ClassicCars.com Journal
1977 Pontiac Grand Prix

1977 Pontiac Grand Prix
The 1970s generally don’t arouse lust from automotive enthusiasts thanks to government regulations and automakers’ inabilities to rise above them, but I feel General Motors was able to grow the styling of Malaise-era vehicles quite nicely. Look at GM’s full-size cars that came out in 1971 and maybe you’ll agree that they still looked good (better?) in 1976. Would you say the same for GM’s Colonnade coupes?

1960 buick electra 225, Diego’s Friday AutoHunter Picks, ClassicCars.com Journal
Gauges are never a bad thing!

While the 1973 Grand Prix was a fine redesign of the pioneering 1969-72 version, I think Pontiac deserves credit for keeping it attractive through 1977. That year the series included Grand Prix, Grand Prix LJ, and Grand Prix SJ. The first two featured a pitiful 301 V8 standard, while the SJ was the lucky recipient of a standard 400 four-barrel. Though not for everyone, this 1977 Berkshire Green Grand Prix on AutoHunter has the optional 350 four-barrel and does a good job of showing how well GM weathered the decade before things truly became “corporate.”

Diego Rosenberg
Diego Rosenberg
Lead Writer Diego Rosenberg is a native of Wilmington, Delaware and Princeton, New Jersey, giving him plenty of exposure to the charms of Carlisle and Englishtown. Though his first love is Citroen, he fell for muscle cars after being seduced by 1950s finned flyers—in fact, he’s written two books on American muscle. But please don’t think there is a strong American bias because foreign weirdness is never far from his heart. With a penchant for underground music from the 1960-70s, Diego and his family reside in the Southwest.

2 COMMENTS

  1. Sir- I am a 1959 born son of a lifetime GM employee (Delco Remy, Anderson, IN). I love those canted fin Buicks- ’59 Chevys suffered extreme rear end lift over 60mph, Buicks tracked straight. Liked the square Fairlane with the stacked headlights, but as a GTO guy agree- too little too late. A Pierce Arrow is too far out of my window.
    But the ’77 Grand Prix? My uncle had a black/red and his second wife had a white/red, both 400’s. For the time, great cars. Flip the air cleaner life and it sounded like a real performance car. Handled and drove well, too.

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