Subaru unveils 2022 BRZ, with more power for even more fun

6-speed manual, rear-driven sports coupe weighs in at less than 2,900 pounds

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2022 Subaru BRZ
Subaru unwraps its 2022 BRZ | Subaru photos

Even with rear-wheel drive and a manual transmission, Subaru says it’s new 2022 BRZ runs counter to the trend of power over precision and focuses instead on “simplicity and fun.”

And yet, the company’s latest sports coupe does have a more powerful engine, a 228-horsepower, naturally aspirated 2.4-liter boxer 4-cylinder, so that fun should pack a decent punch, especially with the new BRZ launching as the “lightest rear-wheel-drive 2+2 production sports car in U.S. market.”

Subaru says the new version continues the low weight, low center of gravity, precise steering handling and affordable pricing of its predecessor, but adds more power, even better handling, a 50 percent increase in torsional stiffness, as well as a modern interior and improved exterior styling.

The 2022 BRZ will be offered in Premium and Limited trim with a standard 6-speed manual or 6-speed automatic transmission, with the automatic getting a new Sport mode to take advantage of the engine’s 15 percent increase in torque, to 184 pound-feet.

Subaru says that while sporty, the new BRZ also is practical with a fold-down rear seat to increase cargo capacity for a mountain bike “or even four race tires and tools for track days.”

Speaking of track days, the car weighs less than 2,900 pounds, thanks in part to the use of aluminum for the roof, front fenders and hood. By the way, the roof has a “subtle” double-bubble appearance, “a nod to vintage racing cars,” Subaru points out, and the front fenders have functional vents designed to reduce drag while releasing hot air from under the hood. 

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A small fin at the back of the rear wheel arches is designed to enhance stability at speed.

Subaru says the BRZ interior was designed around the driver and has a dashboard display that can be programmed and that changes automatically when the car is in track mode.

For more information, visit the Subaru website.

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A former daily newspaper sports editor, Larry Edsall spent a dozen years as an editor at AutoWeek magazine before making the transition to writing for the web and becoming the author of more than 15 automotive books. In addition to being founding editor at ClassicCars.com, Larry has written for The New York Times and The Detroit News and was an adjunct honors professor at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University.

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