Pick of the Day: 25-year rule allows street-legal rally car’s importation

Only 400 of these 1992 Lancia Delta Integrale Evos were produced to celebrate the 5th consecutive world championship

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The Pick of the Day paid a visit to the famed Corkscrew Turn at Laguna Seca race track

One of only 400 special-edition cars created to celebrate Lancia’s fifth consecutive World Rally Championship is the Pick of the Day. The 1992 Lancia Delta Integrale Evo limited edition, in Martini racing team livery, is being advertised on ClassicCars.com, by a private owner in San Mateo, California, who says it has been driven less than 13,000 miles since new.

“One of only 400 produced, this unit is all original and in spectacular condition,” the owner promises. “Very well-preserved and rigorously maintained with under 20k original kilometers (13k miles) on the clock.

“Dazzling white finish is set off with the colorful Martini racing stripes and white rally wheels for a jaunty, race car look,” the advertisement continues. “The interior offers matte-black Alcantara seats by Recaro with contrasting red stitching and bold red seat belts.  A commemorative plaque on the console and WRC badges make note of the special edition trim.

“A truly stunning and collectable example of a legendary rally champion in remarkable, virtually new condition.”

The seller notes that such cars were not imported into the U.S. for sale but is now legal under laws that allow the importation of vehicles at least 25 years old. 

“All import paperwork is in order,” the seller adds. “This car comes with a valid Vermont registration, Vermont plates and a bill of sale.”

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The seller notes that Delta Integrale Evos have become sought after by collectors “and investment value is promising.”

“As a road car, the Integrale is a truly joyful experience,” the seller reports. “Just like on the rally stages, its big rivalry in the early days came in the form of the Audi Quattro, however the Delta was smaller, quicker and much lighter on its feet. The Integrale is a true drivers’ machine and delivers a huge amount of feel and feedback that makes them irresistible.”

The car has a turbocharged, 210-horsepower 2.0-liter 4-cylinder engine, rated at 221 pound-feet of torque. The engine is linked to a 5-speed manual transmission and feeds permanent 4-wheel-drive through a Ferguson viscous coupling and a Torsen rear differential.

The car weighs less than 3,000 pounds and is built on a 97.4-inch wheelbase. The Delta Integrale Evo sprints to 60 mph in 5.7 seconds and has a top speed of 137 mph.

“Compact, but remarkably space-efficient, the Delta body offers 4 doors, reasonable room in both front and rear seating areas and useful hatchback convenience,” the seller adds.

The car is being offered for $169,000. To view this listing on ClassicCars.com, see Pick of the Day.

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A former daily newspaper sports editor, Larry Edsall spent a dozen years as an editor at AutoWeek magazine before making the transition to writing for the web and becoming the author of more than 15 automotive books. In addition to being founding editor at ClassicCars.com, Larry has written for The New York Times and The Detroit News and was an adjunct honors professor at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University.

3 COMMENTS

  1. The most sought after model of any Integrale model of any special editions! And with the mileage and condition! A real true rarity for any collector!

  2. Um, my research shows the original Audi Quattro clocked every measure save weight better, and I have watched Group B & WRC in person and in media since my ’80’s overseas service.
    And I saw a factory backed Quattro smoke all comers at Pike’s Peak.
    I don’t remember these; I do however remember the viscous little doorstop Stratos.
    I’ll have to look some more, but I agree with writer Mike. $169k for a documented & provenanced Stratos I can see. This, however, looks a (very) weak sister to Renault’s R5 and any short Quattro- a car that defines “rare”, “staggering performance”, “unbelievable presence”, and stellar documented to the last period racing provenance.
    And to the Stratos? This Integrale thing isn’t in the same county, much less league.
    I’m sorry, Leon, but being the most sought after doesn’t equate to quality or collectability- McDonald’s sells how many millions of hamburgers a year? Quality? Hmmm. Not worthy.
    In the period between 1946 and 1975, Volkswagen sold how many million original, air-cooled Beetles, of exquisite quality for the price? Very worthy.
    Being “sought after” has never been a synonym for “good”, only that people want; please consider this.
    For my hypothetical $169k, I’d just buy a refurbished ProDrive Subaru WRX STi rally car, and be happy with the ability to smoke almost everything under all conditions.
    Not “rare”; eminently collectable. And one can drive them as intended, break ’em, fix, ‘n drive some more, all on a human scale budget.
    Still, an interesting piece of kit.

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