Ford GT specialist Multimatic launches niche-vehicle program

New SVO project also will handle company’s racing developments

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Multimatic
Multimatic-built Mazda DPi in competition at Daytona International Speedway | Multimatic photos

Multimatic, the Canadian automotive specialist with a history in building race cars, as well as the newest version of the Ford GT, has launched a Special Vehicle Operations effort to focus on the development of niche vehicles.

“Multimatic continues to grow, in both size and technical diversity and this restructuring means we can remain true to our decentralized, agile and innovative operating philosophy,” company president and chief operating officer Raj Nair is quoted in the news release.

“Multimatic is capable of engineering and manufacturing at extremely low and extremely high levels of volume; as well as engineering and manufacturing at the individual component level all the way to a full vehicle level; not to mention our capabilities and accomplishments at the highest levels of global motorsports, this now demands a higher level of specialization and that is what the split will facilitate.”

The new SVO division also will head Multimatic’s own motorsports programs, which include Ford GT and Mustang GT4 racing cars, in addition to doing low-volume body and chassis development and carbon-fiber parts production.

Multimatic was founded more than 30 years ago in Markham, Ontario, as an automotive engineering supplier and producer of body and suspension systems. Its work includes the Ford GT and the Mazda DPi, the RT24-P Daytona Prototype.

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Multimatic did the assembly of the newest generation of the Ford GT

“Multimatic’s model has always been to break the growing businesses down into smaller, more agile operations, and so it has become time for Engineering,” said Larry Holt, who will head the SVO project.  

“After 32 years of continued growth the size and diversity was becoming limiting.  High volume component and systems engineering ultimately requires a different approach to the development of an entire low volume vehicle and so the management of those types of projects has now been split.”

For more information, visit the Multimatic website.

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A former daily newspaper sports editor, Larry Edsall spent a dozen years as an editor at AutoWeek magazine before making the transition to writing for the web and becoming the author of more than 15 automotive books. In addition to being founding editor at ClassicCars.com, Larry has written for The New York Times and The Detroit News and was an adjunct honors professor at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University.

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