Rolls-Royce likes its ‘willfully disruptive’ customers

British luxury marque celebrates with ‘King of the Night’ photo exhibition

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Black Badge
Photographer Mark Ricconi has produced the 'King of the Night' series for Rolls-Royce | Rolls-Royce photos

Rolls-Royce says its Black Badge vehicles connect with the brand with a subset of customers “with willfully disruptive intentions,” buyers who “seek to subvert expected codes of luxury and create highly bespoke and unapologetic symbols of their lifestyles.”

To celebrate such customers, the automaker commissioned photographer Mark Ricconi “to create a pictorial series of Black Badge Cullinan greeting fellow automotive subcultures in Greater Los Angeles, California.”

“The things that connect us are always more powerful than the things that separate us, and this series is a wonderful demonstration of that,” Ricconi is quoted in a news release. 

“I selected each subculture because it shares the philosophies that inform the creation of a Black Badge Rolls-Royce. From the obsessive attention to detail lavished on a lowrider and visceral power of a hot rod to the bold execution of tuned imports and deeply personal customizations applied to ‘brat’-style motorcycles.”

To do the shots, Rolls-Royce provided a “bespoke urban photography recreation module” in the vehicle’s cargo bay.

The photos will be showcased in the “King of the Night” exhibition during the month of March at Rolls-Royce Motor Cars Beverly Hills.

A former daily newspaper sports editor, Larry Edsall spent a dozen years as an editor at AutoWeek magazine before making the transition to writing for the web and becoming the author of more than 15 automotive books. In addition to being founding editor at ClassicCars.com, Larry has written for The New York Times and The Detroit News and was an adjunct honors professor at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University.

4 COMMENTS

  1. Rolls-Royce says its Black Badge vehicles connect with the brand with a subset of customers “with willfully disruptive intentions,” buyers who “seek to subvert expected codes of luxury and create highly bespoke and unapologetic symbols of their lifestyles.” Let us hope they aren’t allowed anywhere near Bentley.

  2. Sadly Joe, ‘advertising gurus’ coming up with nonsense full of buzz words like the Rolls-Royce promotion will be with us forever.
    I’m sure Bentley’s promotion people are full of it too.
    I’ve had a couple of Bentleys and one of the flat grille cars. One day l drove my Shadow into the middle of a country pub car park almost fully occupied by the Harley Owners Group.
    I knew that the Hells Hampsters posed no danger to neither me nor my car but it impressed somebody.
    Some time later l was approached by a young lady who had been tasked with a school project: she was to interview an ‘interesting person’ and she’d decided that someone who was prepared to drive his Rolls-Royce into the middle of a bikie gang met the criteria.
    I guess she didn’t realise that l knew the difference between real bikies and the Hell’s Accountants.
    Maybe the Rolls-Royce copywriters read her project?

  3. How sad, Rolls-Royce so needs to “hang with the homies'” LA style.
    Really ? Pathetic.
    Over the years I’ve had 10 Rolls and Bentleys, I doubt I’d ever want a Cullinan truck in my stable.
    The fall from grace is rapid and far indeed.

  4. Sadly, both Rolls-Royce and Bentley have realised that SUVs are the road to profitability – the must have accessory for the school run and the golf club car park.
    I think the rot set in for R-R when BMW’s design brief for the new Phantom had to have been ‘it doesn’t matter how ugly it is, it has to be different from the Bentley – oh, and bigger. It has to be bigger than the Bentley too.’

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