Ford had an alternative to the GTO and Chevelle

Ford had an alternative to the GTO and Chevelle

1969 Torino GT Sports Roof is the Pick of the Day

“Chevelles are fine and GTOs get a lot of attention, but if you want to stand out from the typical muscle-car crowd, this 1969 Torino GT (Sports Roof) coupe is the only alternative,” notes the dealership offering the Pick of the Day on ClassicCars.com.

“With a strong-running 302 cubic inch V8, it’s the Blue Oval’s answer to the ubiquitous A-body. Better still, it’s a bargain compared to its bowtie-wearing rivals and quite a bit rarer to boot!” the dealer adds.

Ford introduced the Torino in 1968 as the top trim version of the Fairlane model. Torinos were available in sedan, coupe, convertible, station wagon or as a 2-door GT hardtop with a sleek fastback roofline that appeared to have been designed for aerodynamic advantage in stock car racing, which was, indeed, the case. Ford driver David Pearson won the NASCAR championship in 1968 and again in 1969.

“A bit sleeker and more aggressive compared to its hardtop siblings, this Torino GT Sports Roof adds a lot of style to the vintage performance game,” the advertising dealer says. “All the Ford hi-po styling cues are in place here, including the blacked-out hood scoop, C-stripes, GT grille, trunk moldings, rear pillar inserts, and styled GT wheels, so there’s no mistaking it on the street. 

“It was painted sometime this decade and it still looks very presentable and fresh, and the code Y Indian Fire paint shines up beautifully under the sun. 

“There’s a ton of sheet metal in those quarter panels but it’s all quite straight and crisply rendered and panel gaps are very good all around, a testament to a life lived clean all of these years. You don’t see these cars all that often, so you’ll find a lot of enjoyment in the little stuff, from the grille and the matching insert in the hood scoop, and the lovely tail panel and tight-fitting bumper.”

Inside the car has front buckets and rear bench.

“The seats are in very good condition, and we strongly suspect that everything inside is original to this car, so even though there are signs of use that typically accompany a survivor, it has an all-of-a-piece look that’s very appealing,” the dealer points out. 

“The original Philco AM radio is still in the dash, but it’s not working so an upgrade might be in order.”

Torino GTs came with Ford’s 302cid V8. The one in this car is the stock 2-barrel version and is linked to a C4 3-speed automatic transmission with a 9-inch rear. 

The dealer notes that the car recently was updated with a dual exhaust with Glasspack-style mufflers.

The car is located in Lavergne, Tennessee, and is offered for $26,995. 

To view this listing on ClassicCars.com, see Pick of the Day.

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18 Comments

  • Richard Gaskill
    July 29, 2019, 4:38 AM

    A Torino with a 302 may be an alternative to some Chevelles but not an alternative to a 400 c.i. GTO.
    If you want a Torino comparable to a GTO it needs a 428 Cobra Jet engine.

    REPLY
    • George Pehanick@Richard Gaskill
      July 29, 2019, 7:13 AM

      Cool Ford. But it needs a 428 Cobra Jet to be a legit competitor.

      REPLY
    • Doug McBrayer@Richard Gaskill
      July 29, 2019, 4:31 PM

      The 390 was also a more than equal option. Only 10 hp between the two engines from Ford.

      REPLY
  • josh moe
    July 29, 2019, 1:18 PM

    2X on the 428cj, the 1969 Cobra based on the Fairlane was a separate model and came standard with the 428cj. Available in fastback or coupe was a budget musclecar for sure! Without the CJ engine the Torino/Fairlane was easy pickings for big block mopars and chevys.

    REPLY
    • Bill Brooks@josh moe
      July 29, 2019, 2:19 PM

      Hard for a little 289 ci to compete with the big blocks.You needed a 427,428,or 429 ci. Ford should done that.

      REPLY
  • Rick Y
    July 29, 2019, 2:13 PM

    I had a 390 in my 69 GT

    The integrity of the car even new was poor. Water in taillights, door closing properly. Ford had really cheapened their product in 69. I love the looks and the car, but the unibody was poor compared to framed cars. Same with Mustangs and Cougars in ‘69. The cars had been cheapened

    428 was the top of the line

    Not sure about 302’s. I know 351’s were available

    REPLY
  • Mike Grunder
    July 29, 2019, 2:26 PM

    My first muscle car was a 1969 Torino, 2 door coupe, with a 351 Cleveland. Not super fast, but for my first car in High school it was a lot of fun to drive. I found her on blocks with the engine partly disassembled. My dad and I had her running in two weeks. Just about the time I was ready to paint the front quarter panel to have it in prefect condition I wrecked it. Darn, if only I had more sense back then. I have not seen a nice Torino in 20 years what happened to all of them?

    REPLY
  • David Dawson
    July 29, 2019, 3:31 PM

    A coworker in the 70′ had a factory GT. Cobra jet big block in his.

    REPLY