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Ford, Roush will auction one-off ‘Old Crow’ Mustang

Ford, Roush will auction one-off ‘Old Crow’ Mustang

Built in tribute to WWII P-51 aircraft, the car will benefit Experimental Aircraft Association programs

Ford and Roush Performance have produced a one-off Mustang GT, the 2019 “Old Crow,” a homage to World War II triple-ace pilot Col. Bud Anderson and his famed “Old Crow” P-51 Mustang fighter aircraft. The car will be sold at auction to benefit EAA aviation programs.

The car, with 710 horsepower and 610 pound-feet of torque, will be auctioned on July 25 at the Experimental Aircraft Association’s 2019 AirVenture air show in Oshkosh, Wisconsin.

The “Old Crow” Mustang will be the 12th unique Ford to be auctioned to benefit the EAA and its youth and adult aviation programs.

Supercharger boosts horsepower to 710

The car features a custom paint scheme and badging that replicates Col. Anderson’s P-51 aircraft. The car’s 5.0-liter Ford V8 carries a Rough Performance TVS R2650 supercharger and other performance upgrades. It also features Ford’s MagneRide suspension system.

The car’s interior is custom done in aircraft-inspired features and unique military-themed green leather and canvas with red shifter nob and door handles. “P-51” is written on the passenger-side dashboard. The vehicle includes Sparco four-point harness as well as aluminum rear seat-delete.

“Heroes like Col. Bud Anderson have become true living legends in the 75 years since the Allied invasion of Normandy,” said Craig Metros, Ford design director. “Ford is proud to team up with Roush Performance to honor Col. Anderson and all of the brave servicemen and servicewomen who risked their lives during World War II, all while raising funds for the Experimental Aircraft Association, which helps make flying more accessible to America’s youth.”

Col. Anderson posted more than 16 aerial victories in Europe during World War II. He flew 116 combat missions, including a six-hour mission on D-Day. He was never struck by enemy fire or forced to withdraw from an aerial engagement during his career. He earned more than 25 decorations including the Distinguished Flying Cross, Bronze Star and Air Medal.

Custom and aircraft-inspired interior

Roush Enterprises founder and aviation enthusiast Jack Roush, Sr. honored Col. Anderson in 1994 by fully re-creating an authentic P-51 Mustang aircraft with the same badging and paint scheme as the Anderson’s “Old Crow” Mustang plane.

“It is truly special to have the opportunity to honor a great American hero and a truly great friend of mine such as Col. Bud Anderson,” said Roush, Sr.. “My father instilled in me a love of aviation and a deep respect for the brave pilots and airmen of World War II. Building this incredible ‘Old Crow’ Mustang, especially to support the next generation of America’s pilots, has been a very rewarding opportunity and one that we’re proud to share with the world.”

The “Old Crow” Mustang GT will be displayed during EAA’s AirVenture show from July 22-28, an event that annually attracts more than 600,000 aviation enthusiasts to Wittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh, Wisconsin.

Jack Roush autographed the car under the hood

Bids on the car can be made in person or online. For details on bidding, email gathering@EAA.org.

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  • Kenny Heacock
    July 18, 2019, 3:57 PM

    I know of "Bud" Anderson mostly because of his long-time friendship with Chuck Yeager. Yes, I’m a Yeager fan boy. The two were life-long friends and hiked in the Sierras for two weeks or more every year. Chuck always called him "Andy" in any of his biographies. Both were extremely gifted pilots, Chuck not quite as gifted as he was shot down over France early on in WWII. He made up for that by nailing the "sound barrier". Even so, I doubt that I will be bidding on this car….Someone else, a man and wife team, restored both an "Old Crow" and a "Glamorous Glynnis" (sp?) P51. Chuck and Andy actually flew these replicas in air shows, if I remember correctly.

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