Sea Foam launches fuel, oil treatment for high-mileage vehicles

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Sea Foam High Mileage Motor Treatment is designed for use in vehicles driven 75,000 miles or more | Sea Foam photos

In the 1930s, Fred Fandrei wanted to spend more time fishing and less time overcoming fuel-related problems with the engine on his fishing boat. 

Since he worked as district sales manager for Sinclair Refining, Fandrei had access to what he needed to develop a formula for a product that would keep fuel from going bad while in his boat’s gas tank. He sold his product to others, packaging it at first in old beer bottles or quart jars.

One day, as the story goes, a friend in Florida called and asked to buy some of that “Sea Foam stuff” and Fandrei’s product suddenly had a name, Sea Foam Motor Treatment.

Based in Chaska, Minnesota, the Sea Foam Sales Company was officially founded in 1942 and offers a several products for marine and automotive use. 

Its newest product is Sea Foam High Mileage fuel and oil treatment, which the company says was formulated for vehicles with more than 75,000 miles on their odometers.

“It’s no secret that engines lose performance over time for a number of reasons,” Mark Hanson, Sea Foam president, is quoted in the company’s news release. “But we can minimize that long-term wear with High Mileage, helping vehicle owners keep their cars and trucks running great and on the road for much longer than they might otherwise.”

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“Added to fuel,” the company’s announcement states, “High Mileage works to clean and lubricate the entire fuel system, including commonly clogged injectors and carburetor jets. 

“In oil, it works to remove harmful oil residues and deposits that can restrict oil flow and engine lubrication. 

“The result is a cleaner, longer lasting engine that is less prone to burning oil or running rough.”

Sea Foam High Mileage Motor Treatment is available through October at O’Reilly Auto Parts stores, and then will be offered at other outlets later in the fall, the company said.

For more information, visit the Sea Foam website.

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A former daily newspaper sports editor, Larry Edsall spent a dozen years as an editor at AutoWeek magazine before making the transition to writing for the web and becoming the author of more than 15 automotive books. In addition to being founding editor at ClassicCars.com, Larry has written for The New York Times and The Detroit News and was an adjunct honors professor at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University.

1 COMMENT

  1. Instead of just repeating the marketing propaganda, if would have been more useful to detail the chemical difference between Sea Foam, and Sea Foam for High-Mileage Vehicles.

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