Events like Future Classic Car Show key to survival of automotive hobby

Thousands of people attended this year's show, which was a huge success

Like many others, the automotive industry faces the constant challenge of reaching the next generation — in our case, the next classic car fans.

ClassicCars.com CEO Roger Falcione approached me about this issue four years ago. We wanted to put together a show that supports and encourages future generations of car people to showcase their automotive passion.

Thus, the Future Classic Car Show was born.

Have a highly modified Supra or maybe an original BMW? Both are welcome and can qualify for an award. We made the decision to limit our show to cars produced in 1975 or later because, one day, these vehicles will populate show grounds and auction blocks alike. The Future Classic Car Show is a great place to see rising industry trends that, eventually, will impact the market for parts and the cars themselves. It’s the future of the automotive world.

The Future Classic Car Show is designed as a place where automotive enthusiasts of all age can talk about their passion. | Cory Mader photos

The Future Classic Car Show is designed as a place where automotive enthusiasts of all age can talk about their passion. | Cory Mader photos

I’ve been coordinating the show since its inception. Why? Because this is what enthusiasts like myself need. My automotive roots began with my 2003 Subaru WRX (it was at the show) but it can be difficult to move through different automotive circles, especially those dominated by the more traditional classics.

I want the Future Classic Car Show to be a place where import and domestic fans can come together and talk in an environment where everyone is open-minded and accepting, no matter your generation or brand loyalty. After all, aren’t we all car people?

Head Judge Andy Reid (second from left) chats with a participant.

Head Judge Andy Reid (second from left) chats with a participant.

In the show’s fourth year, we focused on quality over quantity. We limited entries to 65 pre-approved cars.

But after more than 350 people said they were interested, I decided to open the Fan Favorite vote to every car in attendance — approved or not. Will this be the same for our next show? Maybe.

There was a good array of cars that made the final cut.

There was a good array of cars that made the final cut.

That’s the beauty of running our own show, one where we speak to participants and attendees alike. We can make changes and adapt the show each year to make it better and better.

And I can’t wait to show you what we have in store for 2020.


Read more about the Future Classic Car show:

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4 Comments

  • Tony H
    February 2, 2019, 8:19 AM

    Excellent, truly well done. The need for shows like this which represent the evolving scene in cars is, as you said, the key to the survival of the hobby. I’ve been a car guy by birth, my father was an original hot rodder, my tastes started out in muscle cars, then post-war euro sports cars and now I appreciate more and more the American cars that my dad was into. It’s come full circle. And you nailed it Rebecca – "after all, aren’t we all car people?" There’s enough divisive bullshit in our lives these days, we should all learn to share our love of cars no matter our particular interest. Bravo.

    REPLY
    • jim speckman@Tony H
      February 2, 2019, 5:26 PM

      I think this is a wonderful program. When i have been at cruse in in the past i always look for the small kids looking ai my 56 f100, i would ask them if they wanted to sit behind the wheel, and watch the excitement on there face. Now i can not get out much any more and i need to sell my last one ,a 2007 plum crazy Daytona Dodge Charger number 813 of 1400 no dents inside all winters Dodge serviced every 3000 miles 59700 highway miles $15,000. this Dodge gets thumbs up ever time i take it out. I am77 and my health is why i have to sell, this is a great hemi, in plum crazy purple. jim rsjs@fuse.net

      REPLY
    • christopher Richard@Tony H
      February 2, 2019, 6:23 PM

      All I know is that if I drive my 80 z28 4spd survivor with 61 k original unmodified miles to a show it doesn’t get a second glance. I drive my 49 Roadmaster or my 65 Fury III convertible it is a non stop QnA. I think some shows draw different ages and the tilting point to post 80’s cars has not yet become the majority thinking at all.

      REPLY
  • tom collins
    February 2, 2019, 8:59 PM

    I am certified auto appraiser. values & demands increasing for customs.street rods, & specialty cars,also,,,,,trucks are hot too. limited on interior room

    REPLY