David Lee and his controversial Dino visit ‘Jay Leno’s Garage’

David Lee, the famed collector of all things Ferrari, recently decided to build his own dream machine

What started life as a 1972 Dino has been transformed into the restomodded machine now called a Dino Monza 3.6 Evo. Lee brought the car to Jay Leno’s Garage so the affable car lover could give it a proper once over.

This is the Dino that Ferrari should’ve built, and that’s the exact sentiment Leno has as well, although we’re sure there are many purists out there who will happily disagree.

“I love the fact that you kept it all Ferrari,” Leno said as he chatted with Lee and learned more about the car. Leno refernced the fact that Lee didn’t swap in a non-Ferrari powerplant into the tail of this Dino. Instead, he opted to have a 3.6-liter Ferrari V8 dropped in. This replaces the lame-duck 180-horsepower V6 that used to live in that space.

Lee has taken his Dino much further than an engine swap however, as the body lines have been slightly altered and the interior brought up to a spec more befitting of the car. Out back, a clear cover sits over the engine while the Daytona seats have been retained to keep the cabin beautiful. All of the changes add up to a gorgeous machine that now produces 400 horsepower and is sure to be an absolute joy to drive.

Jay and David walk through the entire car before hopping in and going for a drive. Along the way, Lee informed Leno that the British car builders who helped bring his vision to life can produce up to five examples per year. Lee will take the orders and sell them on behalf of Mototechnique, which is the shop responsible.

Leno remarked that this classic machine doesn’t need all of the wings, vents, and spoilers which seem to cover modern machines. Instead, the Dino is a perfect five to seven tenths car — just as enjoyable on a brisk canyon road as it is during a relaxed coastal cruise.

Lee knows a lot about what he wants to see from a Ferrari, be it new or old. He’s clearly crafted a classic Dino in a manner that makes sense for today’s world and also for today’s restomod-seeking customer who is willing to fork over what should be a colossal amount of cash to own one.

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  • rudy
    May 31, 2018, 7:30 PM

    I disagree that this is the first "Resto-mod" Ferrari, while I will say it is tastefully done and exquisite. The first Ferrari Resto-mod was done right here locally in Southern California by Phil Dorsey of Phil’s Auto in San Bernardino. He has Customized several Rolls Royce, Porsche’s, Aston Martin and dozens more. His Ferrari Resto-mods are some of the best creations in the Ferrari World today. His last Ferrari (Yellow 456) has been showcased in several articles, and belongs to a Wealthy Tech Mogul who purchased it off Ebay from Mr. Dorsey. Google Yellow 456 Lexus and you will find articles. What is unique about Mr. Dorsey is that he designs, develops and fabricates all his own parts and builds all his own cars without any assistance. Plus if you were lucky enough to meet him you would find out immediately he is very humble, and is a walking encyclopedia of Car Knowledge. https://www.google.com/search?q=yellow+456+ferrari+lexus&rlz=1C1CHBF_enUS788US788&oq=yellow+456+ferrari+lexus&aqs=chrome..69i57.5647j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

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    • spirit@rudy
      June 1, 2018, 11:36 AM

      If Rudy thinks the "first resto-mod Ferrari" was done by Mr. Dorsey he needs to do his homework. It is far from that, and "resto-mod" Ferraris are all over the place…including a particularly nice one, a Lusso with a long-block 4-liter engine. Look it up. This is not "new". Mr. Lee is merely an acolyte, and a good one. The problem is that his base car is a $200k car.

      And what’s with the strange capitalization?

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