Porsche 911 T returns 40 years after original model’s debut

Porsche 911 T returns 40 years after original model’s debut

Porsche springs on us the 2018 911 Carrera T.

Just when you think there can’t possibly be any more 911 variants—we’re already past the 20-car mark—Porsche springs on us the 2018 911 Carrera T.

The car is a direct successor to the original 911 T introduced in 1968. The “T” stands for touring, and as such as the car is very much about driving pleasure, as opposed to incredible track times.

Like the original, the modern 911 T, which starts delivery next March, starts off life as a base 911 but is then put through a weight-loss program. Lighter glass is used for the windows and some of the extras in the cabin, including the door handles, are removed. The resulting weight is 3,142 pounds.

Despite the lightweight ethos of the car, a few mechanical bits have been added. The list includes a shorter constant transaxle ratio, mechanical rear differential lock, PASM Sport adjustable suspension, sport exhaust system, and rear-wheel steering. That last one is available as an option and isn’t normally offered on a 911 Carrera variant.

2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T

Inside, you’ll find sport seats with “911” embroidered in the headrests. The interior trim on the dashboard and doors is in black, as are the new door opener loops (replacing the regular door handles), and for the steering wheel the designers have used Porsche’s Sport GT unit which integrates the driving modes selector. Buyers can also choose to fit bucket seats, which like the rear-wheel steering are being made available for the first time on a Carrera variant. Note, with this option Porsche also removes the rear seats.

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The engine is the latest Carrera’s 3.0-liter twin-turbocharged flat-6. Peak output is 370 horsepower and 339 pound-feet of torque, the latter of which is available in a broad range between 1,750 and 5,000 rpm. A manual with short throw shifter is standard but buyers have the option of a 7-speed dual-clutch transmission.

With the manual, you’re looking at 0-60 mph acceleration in 4.3 seconds. The DCT drops this to 4.0 seconds. The top speed is 182 mph with the manual and 180 mph with the DCT.

Porsche is currently accepting orders for the car whose starting price is $103,150, including destination.

This article, written by Viknesh Vijayenthiran, was originally published on MotorAuthority, an editorial partner of ClassicCars.com.

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