Studebaker, Brough take best of show at Greenwich concours

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Brough is known for motorcycles, but also built this 1936 Superior 8
1932 Studebaker President convertible sedan wins best of show American at Greenwich | Andy Reid photos
1932 Studebaker President convertible sedan wins best of show American at Greenwich | Andy Reid photos

The 20th Greenwich Concours d’ Elegance was full of surprises this past weekend, from the best of show winners to the weather.

The concours is a two-day event with the Saturday show for American cars, and there were more than 120 ranging from the earliest brass-era motorcars to a racing Ford GT40 viewed by a nice-sized crowd in great weather.

The best of show winner was a bit of a surprise, the honors going to a 1932 Studebaker President convertible sedan, one of two built. The car, owned by George Vassos, may be the first Studebaker to win best of show honors at a major concours, but the stunning car certainly deserved the accolades.

Brough is known for motorcycles, but also built this 1936 Superior 8
Brough is known for motorcycles, but also built this 1936 Superior 8

The Sunday portion of the concours is for European vehicles — and this year for rain, which fell most of the day but did not keep owners from showing up with their cars. The majority of the cars scheduled to attend made it to the show, as did the spectators. To say was wet is an understatement, but it was great seeing the hard-core crowd in attendance.

After a few heavy rain showers, the best of show award went to a 1936 Brough Superior 8 owned by Nick Grewal. No, this is not a motorcycle, but a car made by the same company.

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The Superior is one of 14 eight-cylinders produced but and one of only two known to survive.

Unlike Saturday, it was just too wet to drive cars across the show field to receive their awards, with owners accepting their honors on foot.

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Andy Reid's first car, purchased at age 15, was a 1968 Fiat 124 coupe. His second, obtained by spending his college savings fund, was a 1966 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2. Since then, he has owned more than 150 cars—none of them normal or reasonable—as well as numerous classic motorcycles and scooters. A veteran of film, television, advertising and helping to launch a few Internet-based companies, Reid was a columnist for Classic Motorsports magazine for 12 years and has written for several other publications. He is considered an expert in European sports and luxury cars and is a respected concours judge. He lives in Canton, Connecticut.