1973 Ford Mustang Mach 1

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The restored 1973 Ford Mustang Mach 1 looks to be a bargain for an up-and-coming model
The restored 1973 Ford Mustang Mach 1 looks to be a bargain for an up-and-coming model

Many Mustang aficionados will argue that 1970 marked the end of the classic Mustang, and as a result, 1971-73 cars have always lived in the shadow of the earlier models, with prices reflecting this for years. We can remember seeing 100-point restorations of 1971 Mustang convertibles selling for as little as $9,500 at Barrett-Jackson.

Over the past few years as the 1960’s Mustangs have continued to increase in price, the 71-73 cars have finally started getting the respect they deserve. These cars are cool in their own way, and the Pick of the Day, a 1973 Mustang Mach 1, displays the last vestiges of form-over-function design from the Ford Motor Company, with its extreme dimensions and essentially useless rear window.

Mustang stylists were unconcerned that the back window was about useless
Mustang stylists were unconcerned that the back window was about useless

A Mach 1 much like this was driven by Sean Connery as James Bond in the movie Diamonds Are Forever, and it was featured in one of the best Bond movie bloopers ever: it drives into an alley and flips up on two wheels to squeeze through, and upon exit somehow comes out flipped up on the opposite-side wheels.

This stunning 1973 Mach 1 located in Sherman, Texas features a 302 cid engine mated to an automatic transmission, power steering, air conditioning, dual exhaust, Magnum 500 wheels, and a ram air hood, the seller says in the ClassicCars.com listing. The car includes a Marti report that documents that the car is as it came from the factory.

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The seller has included many photos of the Mustang, including a number shot of the underside, showing us what looks to be a very nice, apparently rust-free example.

We think such classics as the 71-73 Mustang exemplify what’s coming up next in the collector car market. With an asking price of only $15,999, this one represents an easy-to-afford step into the collector car hobby. And a Mustang is one of the best-supported and easiest-to-own classic cars in the entire hobby.

To view this listing on ClassicCars.com, see Pick of the Day

Andy Reid's first car, purchased at age 15, was a 1968 Fiat 124 coupe. His second, obtained by spending his college savings fund, was a 1966 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2. Since then, he has owned more than 150 cars—none of them normal or reasonable—as well as numerous classic motorcycles and scooters. A veteran of film, television, advertising and helping to launch a few Internet-based companies, Reid was a columnist for Classic Motorsports magazine for 12 years and has written for several other publications. He is considered an expert in European sports and luxury cars and is a respected concours judge. He lives in Canton, Connecticut.