Eye Candy: Connecticut Street Rod Association Swap Meet and Car Corral

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You never have enough toys

Photos by Dennis David

It marks the beginning and the end of the season in the Northeast, where the winter chill forces all but the hardiest of classic car road warriors off the roads for a few months. The Connecticut Street Rod Association’s spring and fall swap meets are the first and the last to be held each year, with an opening meet held around the first weekend in May and another meet in early November.

The weather can be dicey within those parameters, but the weather gods shinned brightly on the November 8 meet with sunny skies and comfortable temperatures. The good weather helped to create one of the biggest turnouts ever with several thousand people in attendance. It seems that everyone was looking to stock up on parts, tools, and projects for the cold winter.

The show is held in the vast parking area of the Lake Compounce Amusement park in Bristol, Connecticut. The park closes for the season before the show is held. The show hosts approximately 200 venders selling anything from used car parts to new restoration pieces.

The show has something for everyone with some very odd and unusual artifacts found in the isles. Walking the entire show takes the good part of day and many show-goers pull their wagons filled with parts and treasures along to make things easier.

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The popularity of the show caused many to park as much as a half-mile away, but the street rod members did an excellent job of finding room for everyone.

The big show is a great way to end the collector car season in the Northeast and is also worth the drive from anywhere. Indeed, license plates could be seen on spectator cars from Vermont, Massachusetts, New York, and New Hampshire.

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Dennis David is a technology teacher and a professional writer for the collector car industry. He has been writing for 25 years and has authored hundreds of magazine articles. His current work involves writing catalogs for several collector car auction companies. In between writing assignments he does research and judging tabulations for some of the nation's best concours shows. Dennis has also written five books on antique toys and automobiles. He lives in Northwestern, Connecticut and his current stable of collector vehicles includes a Corvette, a Harley Davidson, and a Rolls-Royce Silver Wraith II. For more information visit www.dennisdavidauto.com